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Poster: deadpolitics Date: Feb 22, 2010 11:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH 69... DIVE DIVE

Thank you for your kind offer, Mando :)

Companion planting techniques are so infinitely interesting! I had never heard of using any of those plants as companions so its definitely eye-opening! It just makes sense that these plants have so many uses when planted in a certain way. The best solutions are ones that address all of the related issues at once and companion planting does just that!

I don't have my own garden yet but where I worked, we used marigold, borage, and basil with good effects around tomatoes.

Also, separating your rows of potatoes with rows of bush beans will stymie the Colorado beetles' ability to wreak havoc :)

Have fun with the compost - Hope you got your wheelbarrow bushings greased up :)

"the work of his day measures more than the planting and growing" LET IT GROW

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Feb 22, 2010 12:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: TDIH 69... DIVE DIVE

Basil was superb around our tomatoes for a pesticide, but we had to resort to chemical warfare for a bout of early blight and septoria. We also use marigolds, pansy, cornflower (and likely other stuff I forgot).

Mrs. Mando had three kinds of basil going - Sweet Italian - very tasty, classic basil; Thai Basil - so sweet it was almost hot and African Blue Basil - very pungent and great in sauces and cooking. Every now and then Mrs. Mando would sneak a few leaves into my salads just to watch my eyes water. African Blue is sterile and doesn't produce seed, so you have to cut plantings and put them in water for a few weeks - we've had ours for three years now and it's almost big enough to climb.

We use cat pee in our potato beds (more accurately, that's where the cats have decided they are going to pee).

Good thing sweet potatoes like acidic soil - had no issues with Colorado beetles last year. We had marigolds, two jalapeno, two serrano and a habanero plant in the potato beds and pulled almost 70 pounds out of a 10' x 4' box.

Who'd have thunk I'd get such a kick out of gardening? Very rewarding though - we grew 90% of the vegetables we ate last summer in our backyard from May through October.

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